A Year in the Life of an Amaryllis

amaryllis_akaIf your holiday amaryllis is nearing the end of its blooming cycle, here are tips to enjoy the plant through the year and give it the best chance to bloom again. Unlike paperwhites, which are one-and-done indoor bulbs, with care, amaryllis can re-bloom for years to come.

While flowering, the plant benefits from bright, indirect light and moisture. When each trumpet-shaped flower is finished, snip it off and when the last flower on the stem has shriveled, cut the entire stem about an inch above the bulb. Leave the strappy leaves in tact. Occasionally amaryllis won’t develop leaves until after blooming, so don’t fret if the plant is foliage-free at this stage. However, adding fertilizer to a bulb without leaves will kill the roots.

Treat the bulb as a houseplant throughout the winter by providing direct sunlight, watering when dry below the soil line and feeding common houseplant food once or twice a month. The bulb should remain snuggled in the original pot, with the top half to one-third above the soil line. In spring, the leaves will yellow and die, signaling that they’ve done their job of providing nutrients to the bulb, a common bulb process. Cut the foliage about an inch from the top of the bulb; new leaves will emerge through the summer. Leaves equal energy, so the more leaves developed at this time, the more vigor the bulb has to flower again. During the summer months, you’ll want to give the pot as bright a spot as possible, either indoors or out. Burying the pot in a partially shaded garden bed is also an option.

In September, reduce water significantly until leaves turn yellow and die. Store the plant in a cool, dark area (45 to 50 degrees) for 8-12 weeks, checking regularly for signs of new life and watering sparingly. This fall “Goldilocks” phase of not-too-hot, not-too-cold is critical to the forcing process so choose the resting spot carefully. When you see fresh growth, move the plant to bright light and resume regular watering. The plant is now ready to produce new foliage and flowers.

Many find this process a snap. If that’s not the case for you, keep in mind that the size and quality of the bulb can effect re-blooming, so from the start choose large, blemish-free bulbs which are heavy relative to their size. Amaryllis forced in water are also unlikely to re-bloom as they lack the energy to survive. But if this experiment doesn’t work for you, you may not want to give up as the bulb can take a year off from flowering and then come back with a vengeance. Growing amaryllis sure can be an exercise in patience!

Posted by Linda McDonnell, a Denver Master Gardener

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