Monthly Archives: August 2017

When it Rains, Let’s Measure It

Nolan Doesken of the Colorado Climate Center at CSU demonstrates how to read a rain gauge.

Denver Master Gardeners had the chance to learn why Colorado’s climate can be so frustrating during an entertaining presentation by Nolan Doesken of CSU’s Colorado Climate Center.

The July program was one half continuing education on the basics of our state’s climate and one half recruiting effort for more rain gauge volunteers. Both halves are important to anyone who’s affected by Colorado’s crazy weather.

Doesken is the state climatologist and the founder of CoCoRaHS, the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network. What started as a small volunteer effort in 1998 to track and map precipitation in northern Colorado has expanded to include thousands of volunteers in all 50 states, Canada and the Bahamas.

CoCoRaHS volunteers measure and report the amount of precipitation that falls in their yards. The combined data gives a comprehensive precipitation picture that’s important to natural resource education and research.

Colorado’s early weather reports were sent by telegraph from the top of Pikes Peak beginning in 1873.

Colorado started tracking climate data in the 1870s, but that data was collected only at weather stations. Some of the first official weather measurements were on wind pressure, speed and direction.

But there’s an ongoing need for data that helps tell the weather story in more detail. The combination of Colorado’s high elevation, mid-latitude location, complex mountain topography plus our location far from the continent’s moisture sources make for a challenging climate, Doesken explained.

We can also blame those confounding 40-degree temperature swings from one day to the next on those factors, too.

Anyone who has an interest in being a citizen scientist or learning more about the weather is invited to join the CoCoRaHS network. Volunteers use high-capacity rain gauges placed wherever rain can land without interruption.

Because precipitation can vary from neighborhood to neighborhood, volunteers are needed in all areas. Each time it rains, hails or snows, volunteers measure the amount of precipitation and report it on the program’s website.

The rainfall reports get used every single day, Doesken said. Even 0″ precipitation reports are important. Data users include weather forecasters, hydrologists, researchers, farmers, ranchers, engineers and many others.

Interested volunteers can learn all the details at CoCoRaHS.org. Many helpful video tutorials are available on YouTube, too.

By Jodi Torpey
A Denver Master Gardener

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Do Japanese Beetles Prefer Some Roses More than Others?

Colorado roses have been attacked by Japanese beetles for several years, leaving behind ravaged foliage and deformed flowers. Curiously though, some gardeners report that their roses suffer little to no damage from the insect. Are some rose cultivars less enticing to the Japanese beetle than others? This was the focus of Colorado State University’s 2016 observational study conducted at Littleton’s War Memorial Rose Garden. In the first year of this multi-year study, the following rose cultivars were not found to be damaged by Japanese Beetles: Angel Face, Debut, Hondo, Joseph’s Coat, Mardi Gras, Picotee, Popcorn, Prima Donna, Ralph Moore, Singin’ in the Rain and White Lightnin’.

Conversely, the following cultivars were observed to have the highest levels of Japanese beetle destruction: Pink Promise, Honey Perfume Whisper, Love and Peace, Day Breaker, Strike it Rich, Cherry Parfait, Eureka, Starry Night, Rainbow Knock Out, Lady Elsie May, Carefree Delight and June Lover.

Adult Japanese beetles destroy flowers at the same time bees are gathering pollen, making their impact even more significant. For this reason, CSU’s study identified roses with high Japanese beetle susceptibility and high visitation by bees. Topping this list were Rainbow Knock Out, Lady Elsie May and Strike it Rich. Also in this group were Prominent, Home Run, Easy Does It, Apricot Nectar, Gemini, Starry Night, Baby Boomer, Sweet Diana, Julia Child, Cathedral, Betty Boop, Mon Cherie and Cloud Dancer.

Early findings suggest that gardeners may be able to lessen damage to roses by planting cultivars that are less attractive to Japanese beetles. It also underscores the importance of close monitoring and care of plants to reduce the effects on pollination. In the future, additional information on why some cultivars are preferred over others is likely to emerge.

This CSU publication provides comprehensive information on caring for plants infested with Japanese beetles, the larvae stage effecting turf and more. An additional bit of advice – it has recently been found that crushing the Japanese beetle does not attract more beetles. So, while we’ve previously been advised to handpick and drown the insect in soapy water, feel free to stomp on them too. Since they are night feeders, they are easiest to find around dusk, when they are about to feast on your plants.

Written by Linda McDonnell, a Denver County Master Gardener

Note: The study cited in this post was presented to the Denver County Master Gardener Association by Dr. Whitney Cranshaw of Colorado State University in May 2017.

Photos courtesy of http://www.pixabay.com