Monthly Archives: March 2018

Growing Artichokes in Colorado

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Do you love artichokes? If so, why not add the plant to this year’s veggie garden? Globe artichoke is grown for its tender, delicious flower buds and with some TLC, will be a rewarding plant. A member of the thistle family, Cynara sclolymus is an annual in our zone 5 region, although perennial in  coastal climates with warmer winters and higher humidity. The artichoke in the grocery store was probably grown in northern California.

Planting and Care Tips

Start seeds in early winter, or plant transplants in the ground in early to mid April. Garden centers have starter plants for sale now or will very soon. Protect the plant if Spring “treats” us to a late season frost. A sunny location which gets some afternoon shade is an ideal planting site. Soil should drain well and be amended with 4″ to 6″ of compost, tilled 6″ to 8″ deep. Artichokes are heavy feeders: a 16-16-8 fertilizer can be added at the time of planting and a high nitrogen, 21-0-0, can be worked into the soil monthly thereafter. The plant needs good moisture, however, overly wet crowns will rot and invite slugs. For best success,  water with a soaker hose or drip irrigation and apply mulch to retain moisture and keep the roots cool. An occasional misting will provide beneficial humidity.  Hot, dry conditions yield fast growing but less flavorful plants that are susceptible to aphids.

Artichoke plants can get quite large – up to 4′ feet wide. Check the tag for the spacing on your specific selection. Globe is a highly rated, popular variety with fleshy chokes and excellent flavor, Imperial Star has shown good disease resistance and Romanesco has beautiful purple-tinged bracts and is less “meaty”.

Harvesting

The plant will send up one large and several small buds on a thistle-ly stem. Harvest blooming artichokewhen the buds are tight and about 3″ across. A cook’s tip is to pick chokes which are heavy for their size.  Once the bracts open, the vegetable becomes inedible. It will soon burst into an exquisite flower.

For additional information:

Colorado State University’s trial of six artichoke varieties

Utah State University’s Cooperative Extension’s publication “Artichoke in the Garden”

 

Written by Linda McDonnell, a Denver County Master Gardener

Photos courtesy of Pixabay.com, a source for royalty free images

 

 

 

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Indoor Plants & Clean Air

 

Over thirty years ago, NASA began researching methods of air purification in space crafts to pave the way for long-term human space flight. The study, found here, concluded that many common houseplants are highly effective at removing toxins such as benzene, formaldehyde, ammonia, xylene and trichloroethylene. The findings have been replicated many times over. Their relevance today is unmistakable, especially given the number of man-made products which off-gas chemicals in our homes and workplaces, current energy-efficient construction practices, our focus on healthy living and concern for the environment.

The following are answers to commonly asked questions about the relationship between clean air and indoor plants.

How exactly do plants clean the air?

Plants are effective at absorbing gases through pores on the surface of their leaves. It’s this skill that facilitates photosynthesis, the process by which plants take in carbon dioxide and release oxygen. In effect, all plants can purify the air to some extent, but some do a better job than others.

Studies show that plants can absorb many gases, including a long list of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Benzene (found in some plastics, cloth and pesticides) and formaldehyde (found in some cosmetics, dish detergent, fabric softener and carpet cleaner) are common indoor VOCs that plants help eliminate.

Plant roots and the microorganisms that live in healthy soil also absorb VOCs and other pollutants.

Which plants were used in the NASA study?

Most were common, easy to care for plants which you may have in your home or office right now. Top “air filters” included: Peace lily (Spathiphyllum wallisii), golden pothos (Scindapsus aures), mother in law’s tongue (Sansevieria trifasciata ‘Laurentii’), bamboo palm (Chamaedorea sefritzii), dracaena (Dracaena marginata), spider plant (Chlorophytum comosum), English ivy (Hedera helix), Chinese evergreen (Aglaonema commutatum). Gerbera daisies (Gerbera jamesonii) and potted mums (Chrysantheium morifolium) are also effective air purifiers, but tend to be short-lived flowering houseplants.

Can plants reduce the harmful effects of cigarette smoke in the air?

Cigarettes contain formaldehyde, one of the toxins that plants can remove from the air. However, the plant/cigarette smoke connection was not the focus of the NASA study. A 2010 study by the American Society of Horticulture Science found that ferns were among the most effective plants in formaldehyde removal.  Check out the study for specifics on which ferns offer the best results.

Do I need to live in an indoor jungle to reap benefits?

Hardly! Studies found that approximately one 6″ to 8″ pot per 100 square feet, or 15-18 plants per 1800 square foot house makes a measurable difference.  The more vigorous the plant, the more pollutants it will draw from the air.

 

Photo credits: Bing free images

Written by: Linda McDonnell, a Denver County Master Gardener