Category Archives: Balcony Gardening

Four Ways to Celebrate National Pollinator Week

Today’s the official start of summer and it coincides with another important annual event — National Pollinator Week. From June 20 through June 28, agencies, organizations, companies and ordinary gardeners bring attention to ways to help build healthy environments for bees, butterflies, birds, bats and other vital pollinators.

Here are four ways to celebrate pollinators this week. Please add your ideas to the list:

Million Pollinator Garden Challenge1. Register your garden on the National Pollinator Garden Network.

Become one in a million by registering your pollinator-friendly garden as part of the Million Pollinator Garden Challenge. The goal of the challenge is to register 1,000,000 public and private gardens and landscapes that give pollinators what they need: nesting sites and plants that provide pollen and nectar.

Pollinator Friendly Jacket Image2. Learn more about pollinators.

There are many free pollinator guides available if you need help deciding which plants give the biggest bang for pollinators. There’s also a new book written by a gardener for gardeners. Pollinator Friendly Gardening by Rhonda Fleming Hayes explains that no matter the size of your garden, there are dozens of good plants for helping pollinators. Her detailed plant lists simplify selecting flowers, herbs, vines, shrubs and trees.

3. Become a Habitat Hero.

Encourage more feathered friends to gather in your landscape through the Habitat Heroes program with Audubon Rockies. Apply to have your landscape recognized as a Habitat Hero wildscape. Some of the basics include planting bird-friendly native and regionally-adapted plants, reducing herbicide and pesticide use, and controlling invasive plants.

Pollinator Bee4. Plant zinnias.

A single packet of zinnia seeds will give you a summer full of color and plenty of lovely nectar-filled landing pads for bees and butterflies. Zinnias are some of the easiest annual flowers to grow whether in garden beds or containers on the patio, balcony or deck.

Please keep pollinators in mind and let’s work together to create a lot of buzz during National Pollinator Week!

By Jodi Torpey
A Denver master gardener

 

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Balcony Gardening – Grow A Salad Bowl

Now is a good time to plant baby lettuce, spinach and micro-greens for early Fall harvest.  You do not need a deep container to grow salad greens and you can grow the greens from seed.  Covering the potted seeds with loose plastic wrap holds the moisture and heat and encourages sprouting.

Growing Container Salad Greens:  “You will be able to harvest your first crop in just a few short weeks, using the small tender leaves that are often not available to buy. These micro-greens are the mix of choice for gourmet salads. Leafy greens also make a flavorful addition to sandwiches or wraps.”

Salad greens

Radishes also mature quickly.  Use radish greens instead of basil in your pesto recipe.Radishes

As a container gardener you can quickly move your salad bowl inside if we get a sudden Colorado frost.  In a sunny window you can keep growing salad all winter.

If you need an incentive, a CSU Extension publication lists the nutrients in different salad greens and has notes about taste.  It has great photos — I can now identify Mizuna.  Enjoy!

Balcony Gardening – Green Walls

First it was “Green Roofs” now it is “Green Walls” or Living Walls.   You can create an outdoor Green Wall on your balcony.

a couple of trellis, anchored in a pot of dirt against one of your balcony walls. Depending on the amount of light you could grow flowering vines in the summer then plant peas in early spring.

metal shelving or a bookcase against the wall with planters on each shelf.  If your balcony is shady your “wall” can be made up of indoor plants – philodendron or other trailing plants.

– there are more sophisticated systems of hanging Green Wall “pockets” that look kind of like a magazine rack or sets of pots that can be attached to a wall in rows.   You could have edible plants like herbs and lettuce which require very little soil.  An internet search on green wall gardens will show you many options. 

As always, weight, water and building rules remain considerations for any system attached to the wall.  Ask before you invest.

Visit a local green wall.   “July Walking Tour – Sensory Garden’s Green Wall” by Angie Andrade Foster, Senior Horticulturist, Denver Botanic Gardens.

Colorado State University has a residence hall with an indoor green wall.  It is the Pavilion at Laurel Village.   An internet search will yield a variety of stories and photos.

Send me a comment and let me know where you find other indoor or outdoor Green Walls in Denver.

Balcony Gardening – Succulent Gardens

The Summer Solstice is past, Fourth of July is coming up. What if you forgot to water the flowers, the vegetable plants did not get enough sun and then it hailed!

Denver Botanic Gardens - Succulent Garden

Denver Botanic Gardens – Succulent Garden

There is a succulent garden for all budgets and all spaces:

–  buy individual cactus and arrange the pots on a tray a quick solution and many can become house plants at summer’s end.

– many garden centers have succulent gardens ready for purchase, ask how to care for them

–  buy annual or perennial rock garden plants and create your own using a shallow container, cactus type potting soil and gravel

– Winter-hardy cactus could be an option for your balcony

Plant Select Petites  has “Garden Treasures for Small Spaces” and a lot of suggestions for plants, planting and maintenance.

Pay attention to where you buy your plants.  If they were indoors they will do best  in a shady location.  If they were outside in full sun they will enjoy a sunny balcony.

If a cactus or succulent looked sunburned that is very possible if it was too much sun too soon.  Put your succulent garden in a part sun, part shade location to begin.  Even a cactus can get sunburned.       

 When in doubt – don’t water.  Too much water will cause the roots to rot and the damage is hard to spot until it is too late.  (I’ve had succulents surprise me by just falling over!)

The internet has lots of information on succulent gardens.  If all this sounds like a better project for next month, then a few pots of red, white and blue petunias is a cheerful alternative.  Enjoy!

Balcony Gardening – Soil, Light and Plants

French Tarragon 1 year after planting in container

French Tarragon 1 year after planting in container.

Time to plant your balcony garden

Soil for container plants is easy to find. Don’t use “Top Soil”. It is likely to be mostly clay and too heavy for your balcony use. Potting soil (with or without time release fertilizer) will be just fine.

If you buy plants – fit them tightly into the pot.  You will have a nice showy pot and it is unlikely that they will outgrow the space over the summer.  If you plant seeds, don’t put the pot in full sun.  Keep seeds moist until they germinate by covering the pot with plastic wrap to keep the soil from drying out and

How much sun your balcony gets will determine your choice of plants.   Don’t forget reflected light from nearby buildings.  Your balcony may receive direct sun only in the morning, but also receive reflected light from the building next door in late afternoon.  This article lists 5 ways to categorize sun and shade for choosing plants (about 2/3 down into this article is the list). More information is there is you want the details. 

Vegetables:  most container vegetables like full sun but may need shade from reflected afternoon light or direct afternoon sun.  Vegetables need to be checked every day to see if they need water – many will, especially when putting on fruit.   Recommended Container Vegetables are listed by type and by name.

Herbs:  Basil is a standard and will probably need water daily in hot weather.  Try cilantro or a chocolate mint plant.  Most perennial herbs grow well in containers and may survive the winter.  Good choices are  French Tarragon, any of the Thyme varieties, Winter Savory, Chives.  Here is more information about Growing Herbs in Containers.

Flowers:  If you would like to screen the view from your balcony – plant tall annuals.   An 8 inch deep pot is best.  All of these grow easily from seed:  sunflowers, cosmos, morning-glory (add a trellis for it to climb).  Amaranth is a grain ( not very edible) and grows 6 feet tall!  Look for the burgundy variety.